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5 Best Plants for Ball Python

 


Most recommended
Fluker s Repta Vines-Pothos for Reptiles
  • Item Weight 3.87 ounces
  • 10 x 3 x 12 inches
  • Fluker Labs
A good choice too
Exo Terra Artificial Plant, Reptile Terrarium
  • Size: Small
  • Color: Mandarin
  • Standard Packaging
A good choice too
Fluker s Repta Vines for Reptiles
  • Size: Red Coleus
  • Item Weight 0.32 ounces
  • 72 x 0.02 x 0.02 inches
Flexible Bend-A-Branch Jungle Vines Plastic
  • 1 x 1 x 1 inches
  • Hamiledyi
  • length 120cm
Exo Terra Silk Terrarium Plant
  • Small, hanging silk plant
  • 2 x 6 x 17 inches
  • 0.64 Ounces

Choose the Best Plant for Ball Python

Customer’s Choice: the Best Rated Plants for Ball Python

1 users answered this survey. Please help us improve this review!

100.00% of users selected Fluker s Repta Vines-Pothos for Reptiles, 0.00% selected Exo Terra Artificial Plant, Reptile Terrarium, 0.00% selected Fluker s Repta Vines for Reptiles, 0.00% selected Flexible Bend-A-Branch Jungle Vines Plastic and 0.00% selected Exo Terra Silk Terrarium Plant. Every month we analyze your answers and change our rating.

When it comes to the best plants for ball pythons, there are many things to take into account. The type of plant, its toxicity, how it will impact your snake’s behavior, and more. In this article, we’ll answer some of the most common questions about plants and snakes to help you decide what’s best for your pet.

One of the most important things to consider when choosing plants for your ball python is their safety. Some plants are toxic to snakes and can cause serious health problems. Be sure to do your research and only choose plants that are known to be safe for reptiles. [1]

Another thing to keep in mind is how the plant will impact your snake’s behavior. Some plants can be very stimulating and may cause your snake to become stressed or agitated. Others may provide a sense of security and help your snake feel more comfortable in its enclosure. Choose plants that will create the desired atmosphere for your pet.

 Best Plants for Ball Python

Finally, you’ll also want to consider the aesthetic appeal of the plant. After all, you’ll be looking at it every day! Choose something that you think looks nice and will complement the look of your snake’s enclosure.

With these things in mind, let’s take a look at some variants that stores have.

Exo Terra Artificial Plant, Reptile Terrarium Decoration — the Editor’s choice!

The Exo Terra Mandarin Jungle Terrarium Plant is an extremely realistic replica of a real plant, making it ideal for use in more sterile set-ups. With its dark and light green leaves, the plant lies in a way that makes your reptile think it is the real thing.

This plant offers the same advantages as live plants whether the purpose is decorative, creating hiding spots, or enlarging the dwelling area. The plants are easy to clean and simple to maintain. A combination of live plants and the Exo Terra Terrarium Plants is perfect so even in spaces where live plants won’t thrive, there can be greenery. Not to mention, this terrarium decoration comes with its own extensive list of benefits like looking great and being easy to take care of!

Pros
  • Realistic replica of a real plant
  • Perfect for more sterile set-ups
  • Offers the same advantages as live plants
  • Easy to clean and simple to maintain
  • Perfect for water interior
  • Sturdy

Cons
  • Smaller than the photo size
  • Not realistic
  • Easy to fall apart
  • Not good suction cups


Fluker’s Repta Vines-Pothos for Reptiles and Amphibians — the best for material!

Fluker’s Repta Vines are the perfect way to add some natural beauty to your reptile or amphibian terrarium. These lifelike vines are made of non-toxic polyethylene material and come with suction cups to affix them securely to the sides of your tank.

They’re also easy to clean and disinfect, making them a great addition to any pet home. At 6 feet in length, these vines are sure to make a dramatic impact in any habitat. So bring some of the outdoors inside and give your pet the perfect place to climb, hide, and explore with Fluker’s Repta Vines.

Pros
  • Great quality
  • Realistic looking
  • Good for hiding
  • Non-toxic polyethylene material
  • Easy to clean and disinfect

Cons
  • Plastic and inflexible
  • Hard to maneuver
  • Poor suction power
  • Exposed wires


Fluker’s Repta Vines for Reptiles and Amphibians Terrariums —the best for style!

Looking for a way to spruce up your reptile or amphibian terrarium? Take a look at Fluker’s Repta Vines! These lifelike, natural-looking vines come in four styles – English Ivy, Pothos, Red Coleus, and Purple Coleus – and are the perfect addition to any terrarium.

All of our vines come with suction cups to affix them securely to the glass of your tank, and are made of nontoxic polyethylene material for easy cleaning and disinfecting. Plus, our vines make great decorations and add some naturalism to your terrarium. Your reptile or amphibian will love hiding and climbing among the lush greenery of our Repta Vines!

Pros
  • Lifelike natural-looking hanging vines
  • Non-toxic polyethylene material
  • Suction Cups
  • Different styles to choose
  • Great as decorations

Cons
  • Suction cups don’t really hold the vines
  • Weird metal hooks
  • Too many metal wires
  • Rough and plastic textures


Hamiledyi Flexible Bend-A-Branch Jungle Vines — the best for strength!

Looking for a way to add some life to your pet’s enclosure? Hamiledyi Flexible Bend-A-Branch Jungle Vines are the perfect solution! Made of PU and metal, with a natural look and feel, these vines are sturdy, waterproof, and bendable – making them easy to style to fit your pet’s enclosure. They’re also great for providing exercise for many reptile species.

And because they’re made of silk and plastic, they’re ideal for use in more sterile set-ups where real plants can’t thrive. So bring the beauty of the jungle to your pet’s home with Hamiledyi Flexible Bend-A-Branch Jungle Vines!

Pros
  • Cand bend freely, very strong
  • Natural look with a 3D effect
  • Perfect for arboreal reptiles and amphibians
  • Made of silk and plastic
  • Easy styling
  • Waterproof

Cons
  • Leaves can bleed color
  • Too big size
  • Needs a cutting


Exo Terra Silk Terrarium Plant (Ficus) —the best for size!

Bring the jungle into your home with the Exo Terra Ficus Silk Terrarium Plant. This attractive, easy-to-care-for plant is the perfect addition to any reptiles’ or amphibians’ home. The plant’s small size and hanging design make it ideal for use in more sterile terrarium set-ups, while the silk material ensures that it is easy to clean.

The plant’s deep green color and shiny leaves create a realistic and natural look that will complement any reptile or amphibian’s home.

Pros
  • Small size
  • Hanging design
  • Silk material
  • Deep green color
  • Shiny leaves

Cons
  • Too small
  • Leaves can be easily ripped off
  • Fake looking


Buyer’s Guide

Safe plants for ball pythons

Not all plants are safe for pythons, and some can even be toxic. When choosing plants for your python’s enclosure, be sure to research which ones are safe and which ones to avoid. Some of the best safe plants for pythons include:

  • Alocasia Polly;
  • Aloe;
  • Wart Fern;
  • Golden Pothos;
  • Blue Star Fern;
  • Snake plant;
  • Arrowhead Vine.

Alocasia Polly

The Alocasia plant is naturally found in tropical rainforests, but it’s not just its appearance that makes this variety striking. The leaves have a unique shape and their deep green color will contrast beautifully with your ball python’s enclosure background as well! This would be an excellent choice for those who want something large enough to provide cover.

Aloe

Aloe plants are not only easy to take care of, but they’re also safe for pythons. Aloes come in a variety of colors and sizes, so you can find one that fits your python’s enclosure perfectly. Plus, the gel inside aloe leaves can be used to treat burns and wounds – making it a great plant to have on hand in case of emergencies.

Wart Fern

The leaves of Microsorum Scolopendrium (Wart Fern) are not only smooth but also leatherlike in texture, making it an excellent plant for ball python tanks. The ruggedness and ability to withstand abuse from these tough creatures make this a great candidate when looking at types that can be placed inside your wet environment aquarium setup!

As ball pythons are typically found in humid environments, this plant is perfect for them.

It requires both high temperatures (65-80 degrees) and humidity levels to survive as ball pythons require.

This plant can survive in different conditions such as in full sun, partial shade, and full shade.

Another plus of this plant is that it grows slowly, so you won’t have to replace it as often as other plants. Additionally, its slow growth rate means it won’t take up too much space in your tank.

The plant is highly pest resistant and disease resistant, which will help your ball python stay healthy by preventing it from facing this kind of stress.

Wart Fern

Another reason why this plant is good for your ball python is that it is known to have a calming effect. So, if your ball python is feeling stressed, this plant can help to calm it down.

Golden Pothos

This plant is known by many names, including golden pothos, hunter’s robe, and Ceylon creeper. It is a member of the Araceae family and is an herbaceous perennial. This plant is an excellent choice for use in snake enclosures because it is hardy and can thrive in dimly lit and damp conditions.

The variegated types of golden pothos are more popular among snake owners. The leaves of these plants have different colors, such as yellow, green, and white.

This plant is perfect for ball pythons tank because it provides good shelter as an egg-laying site.

Blue Star Fern

The Blue Star Fern is a unique and epiphytic plant native to subtropical regions of America. It can grow up high in the trees, but it also likes hanging out on rocks near waterfalls or streams where there’s plenty of humidity around for its roots!

This exquisite plant is perfect for any container or ball python tank. It requires the right temperature and humidity, but with some patience you can get it just right! These plants generally grow 12-36 inches tall so make sure your enclosure will accommodate this size before trimming away at its roots if necessary.

They are good for wild caught ball pythons. They can take the beating of these tough animals and also provide great shelter to them, making it more bearable when you have an enclosure full!

Snake Plant

Snake plants are a type of Sansevieria, which was originally from Sri Lanka. They’re uniquely shaped and commonly seen in houses as houseplants but can also be used for ball python tanks if you want to give your pet an extra plant that won’t die too quickly!

These plants have a shallow root system which means they need less water and can survive longer in lower light. They grow slowly, so you don’t need to trim them frequently.

They require a drier condition. And also capable of surviving the beating from ball pythons! They help to filter indoor air, converting carbon dioxide into oxygen for you in your home or business.

Arrowhead Vine

The Syngonium Podophyllum is a great plant for those who want to keep their houseplant simple. It’s also known as Arrowhead Philodendron and has leaves that look like an arrowhead’s pointy tip.

This plant has smooth green leaves with pink markings on them, making it stand out from other plants. Another thing that makes this variety desired and interesting is the wide range of colors they come in – there’s something for everyone!

Arrowhead Vine

If you want to keep your ball python happy, then it is best not only for the health of their tank but also aesthetically pleasing. A great choice would be Syngonium as they can live with a highly moisturized environment and manage in humid conditions that are common among these types of tanks.

This plant grows slowly, so it can easily be kept in a tank for a year. However, after a year you will need to provide it with more space. It is still one of the best plants for ball python tanks.

When it comes to plant safety, it is always better to go on the side of caution.

If you are unsure about a particular plant, consult with a reptile specialist or vet before adding it to your python’s home. [2]

Is it necessary to have plants in a vivarium?

Plants are not necessary for a vivarium, but they can provide many benefits for both the reptile and the owner. Plants can help to create a more naturalistic and aesthetically pleasing enclosure, and can also provide hiding spots and enrichment for the reptile. In addition, plants help to regulate humidity and can even filter the air in the enclosure. If you choose to add plants to your vivarium, be sure to research which ones are safe for your particular reptile species.

When adding plants to your python’s enclosure , be sure to go with safe options that won’t pose a risk to your pet. Some of the best plants for pythons include aloe, spider plants, Boston ferns, bromeliads, and orchids. If you’re not sure about a particular plant, consult with a reptile specialist or vet before adding it to your python’s home. With a little bit of research, you can create a beautiful and safe vivarium for your beloved pet python.

What to look for when choosing plants?

When choosing plants for your python’s enclosure, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, research which plants are safe for your particular reptile species. Second, consider the size of your python and the size of the enclosure when selecting plants. You’ll want to choose plants that won’t overwhelm the space or pose a risk to your pet. Third, think about the humidity levels in the enclosure and choose plants that will thrive in those conditions. And finally, pick plants that will complement the natural colors and patterns of your python. With a little bit of thought and planning, you can create a beautiful and safe vivarium for your beloved pet python. [3]

What plants to avoid

Not all plants are safe for pythons, and some can even be toxic. When choosing plants for your python’s enclosure, be sure to research which ones are safe and which ones to avoid. Toxic plants to avoid include:

  • Dieffenbachia;
  • Philodendron;
  • Pothos;
  • Schefflera;
  • Umbrella Plant.

These plants can harm your python if ingested, so it is best to avoid them altogether. They are toxic for pythons because they contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause burning and irritation if they come into contact with the skin or mucous membranes. If you are unsure about a particular plant, consult with a reptile specialist or vet before adding it to your python’s home.

With a little bit of research, you can create a beautiful and safe vivarium for your beloved pet python. Just be sure to avoid toxic plants like dieffenbachia, philodendron, pothos, schefflera, and umbrella plant. With these simple tips in mind, you’ll be on your way to creating the perfect home for your pet python.

Do ball pythons like live plants?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as each python is different. Some pythons may enjoy the presence of live plants in their enclosure, while others may not be so fond of them. If you’re unsure about whether or not your python would like live plants in its enclosure, it’s best to start with a few small, non-toxic plants and see how your pet reacts. If your python seems uninterested or stressed by the presence of plants, you can always remove them from the enclosure. With a little trial and error, you’ll be able to figure out what works best for your particular pet python.

There are a few different types of plants that can be used with ball pythons, however not all plants are created equal. Some plants may be toxic to ball pythons if they ingest them, while others may cause irritation or other issues. It is important to do your research before adding any plant to your ball python’s enclosure.

Some safe and recommended plant options for ball pythons include: bromeliads, ficus trees, hibiscus, ivy, mango trees, money trees, palm trees, philodendrons, snake plants and spider plants. These plants are not only safe for ball pythons, but can also provide enrichment and help create a naturalistic enclosure.

When choosing plants for your ball python’s enclosure, it is important to consider the size of the plant and the size of your snake.
You will also want to make sure that the plants you choose are non-toxic and won’t cause any irritation if your snake comes into contact with them.

With so many different plant options available, there is no reason why you can’t create a beautiful and naturalistic enclosure for your ball python. Just be sure to do your research and choose plants that are safe for snakes![4]

Can I use a substitute instead of plants?

If you’re not interested in using live plants in your ball python’s enclosure, there are a few different substitutes that you can use. One option is to use artificial plants. These plants are safe for snakes and won’t cause any irritation if they come into contact with them. Artificial plants also have the benefit of being low-maintenance and easy to care for.

Can I use a substitute instead of plants?

Another option is to use paper or silk leaves. These leaves can be taped or glued to the sides of the enclosure and create a similar look to live plants. Silk leaves are especially realistic and can provide a naturalistic appearance for your snake’s home. [5]

Finally, you could also use real, but dried, leaves in your ball python’s enclosure. These leaves won’t provide any enrichment or benefits for your snake, but they can create a naturalistic appearance. Just be sure to remove any dried leaves before they start to rot or mold.


FAQ

Can I put live plants with my snake?

It is important to do your research before adding any plant to your ball python’s enclosure. Some plants may be toxic to ball pythons if they ingest them, while others may cause irritation or other issues.

Some safe and recommended plant options for ball pythons include: bromeliads, ficus trees, hibiscus, ivy, mango trees, money trees, palm trees, philodendrons, snake plants and spider plants. These plants are not only safe for ball pythons, but can also provide enrichment and help create a naturalistic enclosure.

When choosing plants for your ball python’s enclosure, it is important to consider the size of the plant and the size of your snake. You will also want to make sure that the plants you choose are non-toxic and won’t cause any irritation if your snake comes into contact with them. [6]

Are succulents good for a ball python?

While some succulents are safe for reptiles, others can be toxic. It is important to do your research to make sure that the specific type of succulent you are interested in is safe for ball pythons.

Some safe and recommended succulents for ball pythons include: aloe vera, jade plant, sedum and snake plant. These plants are not only safe for ball pythons, but can also provide enrichment and help create a naturalistic enclosure.

As you can see, there are many factors to consider when choosing plants for your ball python. Some plants may be safe for your snake, but not provide the right level of humidity or temperature. Others may be too toxic for your snake to ingest. It is important to do your research and consult with a reptile specialist before adding any plants to your ball python’s enclosure.

There are many benefits to adding plants to your ball python’s enclosure. Plants can help create a more naturalistic environment, increase humidity levels, and provide hiding places for your snake. However, there are also some risks associated with keeping plants in an enclosure with a venomous snake. Make sure you choose non-toxic species and keep an eye on your snake.

Are any plants toxic to ball pythons?

Yes, some plants can be toxic to ball pythons if they ingest them. It is important to do your research and consult with a reptile specialist before adding any plants to your ball python’s enclosure.

Some safe and recommended plant options for ball pythons include: bromeliads, ficus trees, hibiscus, ivy, mango trees, money trees, palm trees, philodendrons, snake plants and spider plants. These plants are not only safe for ball pythons, but can also provide enrichment and help create a naturalistic enclosure. [7]

Is bamboo toxic to reptiles?

No, bamboo is not toxic to reptiles. In fact, bamboo can provide many benefits for reptiles, including enrichment, hiding places and a place to climb.

Bamboo is a safe and recommended plant for ball pythons. It can help create a more naturalistic environment and provide your snake with enrichment. Just be sure to choose non-toxic species and keep an eye on your snake.

Do ball pythons eat plants?

No, ball pythons do not eat plants. In fact, most snakes are not interested in eating plants. However, some snakes may nibble on plants if they are starving or if the plant smells like prey.

If you are concerned that your ball python may try to eat a plant, it is important to do your research and consult with a reptile specialist.

Useful Video: Best Plants for Bioactive Ball Python Setup

Conclusion

Plants are a necessary part of your ball python’s environment, and we’ve given you some of the best plants on the market to choose from. By providing your snake with hiding spots, perching branches, and climbing vines, you can help create a healthy and stimulating home for them. Ball pythons need access to fresh air and UVB light, so be sure to provide an open area where they can bask in the sun. If you have any questions about which plants are best for your pet snake, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We love helping our customers create the perfect environment for their reptiles!


References:

  1. https://thepetenthusiast.com/ball-python-plants/
  2. https://emborapets.com/best-plants-for-ball-pythons/
  3. https://www.quora.com/What-plants-can-I-put-in-my-ball-pythons-habitat-to-help-with-humidity
  4. https://www.exoticdirect.co.uk/news/ball-pythons-as-pets-and-what-setup-you-need
  5. https://succulentsaddiction.com/are-any-plants-toxic-to-ball-pythons-5aba9bbe/
  6. https://www.thebiodude.com/blogs/bio-activity-with-your-pets-how-does-it-work-with-mine/bioactivity-and-ball-pythons
  7. https://www.exoticdirect.co.uk/news/ball-pythons-as-pets-and-what-setup-you-need